Steles – Huang Yi Project (2015-2016)
       
     
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Steles – Huang Yi Project (2015-2016)
       
     
Steles – Huang Yi Project (2015-2016)

The latest body of work collectively titled Steles (2015) focuses on the stone steles that have played such a crucial role in the documentation of the history of China. In this case he was inspired by the late Qing dynasty imperial bureaucrat Huang Yi (1744 – 1802) who in his leisure time was also a dedicated amateur archaeologist, painter, poet and calligrapher. In the last years of the 18th century he made two trips in which the focus was on documenting steles mainly located in Shandong Province and Henan Province. Through his travel diaries, paintings, and rubbings, he provided an invaluable record of cultural artifacts that otherwise might have disappeared altogether through neglect. In planning his own trips, Taca consulted Huang Yi’s diaries, Diary on Visiting Steles near Mount Song and the Luo River and Diary on Visiting Historical Steles from Jining to Tai’an.

Like Huang Yi 200 years before him, Taca embarked on expeditions to locate traces of the past as preserved in steles but whereas Huang Yi could still identify, describe and catalogue actual examples, Taca had to be satisfied with inscriptions that are largely erased through the passage of time or exist only in fragmentary state. Recognizing the futility of his task, he nonetheless perseveres in preserving whatever he can. At the opposite end of the spectrum from documentary photography, Taca’s images have a forlorn and timeless beauty that are simultaneously totally specific and yet evocative of the relentless passing of time.

To accomplish this, he uses silver barium sulfide photographic paper which contributes greatly to the effects he wants to convey. As a result of its intrinsic qualities, this type of photographic paper results in elusive images since unless seen from a specific angle, they dissolve into silver reflected light.

Taca is the latest link in a chain that began with Huang Yi when he recorded his discoveries in his diaries and shortly before his death showed his painting to friends when they came to visit him, as well as sending them to Beijing and Hangzhou. Copies of the 400 or so rubbings he made were also widely circulated. Taca followed in Huang Yi’s footsteps and contributes to the ongoing dialogue not through additions to the scholarly record but through his own poetic insights.

1-非相石 copy.jpg
       
     
2-鲁王墓1.jpg
       
     
3-鲁王墓2 copy.jpg
       
     
4-洛水 copy.jpg
       
     
5-郑季宣碑 copy.jpg
       
     
6-翻经台 copy.jpg
       
     
7-汶水 copy.jpg
       
     
8-武粱祠 copy.jpg
       
     
9-藏龍澗 copy.jpg
       
     
10-趵突泉 copy.jpg
       
     
11-大明湖 copy.jpg
       
     
12-王母池 copy.jpg
       
     
13-岱庙石 copy.jpg
       
     
14-龙洞 copy.jpg
       
     
15-灵岩寺 copy.jpg
       
     
16-尖山 copy.jpg
       
     
17-启母石1 copy.jpg
       
     
18-启母石2 copy.jpg
       
     
19-太室阙 copy.jpg
       
     
20-石淙 copy.jpg
       
     
21-嵩阳书院 copy.jpg
       
     
22-龙门1 copy.jpg
       
     
23-龙门2 copy.jpg
       
     
24-六和塔 copy.jpg
       
     
25-虎跑 copy.jpg
       
     
26-飞来峰1 copy.jpg
       
     
27-飞来峰2 copy.jpg
       
     
28-等慈寺 copy.jpg